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You are here: Home / News & Events / CLS Speaker Series / Fall 2020 / Chaleece Sandberg (Penn State) - Monolingual and bilingual abstract semantic associative network training (AbSANT/BAbSANT): theoretically-based anomia therapy that promotes within- and cross-language generalization

Chaleece Sandberg (Penn State) - Monolingual and bilingual abstract semantic associative network training (AbSANT/BAbSANT): theoretically-based anomia therapy that promotes within- and cross-language generalization

When Nov 06, 2020
from 09:00 AM to 10:30 AM
Where ZOOM Virtual Room (Link will be provided)
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Monolingual and bilingual abstract semantic associative network training (AbSANT/BAbSANT): theoretically-based anomia therapy that promotes within- and cross-language generalization 

Generalization to untrained items is one measure of therapeutic success in aphasia treatment research. Protocols that capitalize on theorized relationships within the semantic system are more likely to promote generalization. Previous work based on the complexity account of treatment efficacy (CATE; Thompson et al., 2003) and leveraging the unique relationship between abstract and concrete words has shown that when abstract words are trained, concrete words also improve, but not vice versa (e.g., Kiran et al., 2009). Additionally, previous work based on the revised hierarchical model (RHM; Kroll & Stewart, 1994) has shown that training in the non-dominant language promotes cross-language generalization in bilingual persons with aphasia (e.g., Edmonds & Kiran, 2006). This work replicates previous work showing the generalization benefit of training abstract words in monolingual aphasia, successfully extends this abstract word training protocol to bilingual aphasia, and shows the additive benefit of training in the non-dominant language in bilingual aphasia.